Categories
Drink The Connected Table SIPS

Sipping with Clay Shannon, Shannon Family Wines

 

After a long career in vineyard management in Napa Valley, Clay Shannon set out to acquire land to make his own wines in 1996. “I wanted a mountain vineyard that had red dirt to grow some rich, well-concentrated red grapes with strong tannins,” he shared with us. Shannon found his land on a remote ridge at 2500 feet elevation in Lake County outside Napa Valley and Mendocino to establish his ranch and Shannon Family Wines which he oversees with his wife, Angie Shannon.

Clay and Angie Shannon
Clay and Angie Shannon, Shannon Family Wines

The Lake Country wine region is home to about two dozen wineries and seven designated American Viticultural Areas (AVA). Grape growing here dates to the 1800s but was replaced by other agricultural products during Prohibition era. Grape growing resumed in the 1960. The area is mountainous with cool winters and volcanic soils. The area’s just still far enough away from the Napa scene to be a “discovery journey.”

Shannon's Sheep
Shannon also herds sheep.

About half of the Shannon’s 2000 acres is dedicated to vines, with a focus on organic regenerative farming The rest is preserved. There’s also a herd of sheep, which inspired the label for Ovis, a premium single vineyard estate red. Shannon cultivates Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Petite Sirah, Sauvignon Blanc and Rhône reds. He is also experimenting with other drought-resistant varieties including Touriga Nacional, Counoise, Nero d’Avola and Alicante Bousche.

Many have referred to Clay Shannon as a “maverick” for settling in Lake County which still has a lower profile than its starry neighbor, Napa. It is a title he eschews. “I’m just cowboy farmer who wanted to the own the best land I could to make the wine I wanted. Sometimes you need to venture a little further to find what you are looking for.”
www.shannonfamilywines.com

What we tasted:

Sauvignon Blanc

Clay Shannon Sauvignon Blanc. Think lime, gooseberry, white peach and a hint of flint. SRP $30

Shannon Cabernet Sauvignon

Clay Shannon Cabernet Sauvignon: Grapes are sourced from the lots to make this red which is has notes of raspberry, cherry and tobacco. SRP: $45

Buck Shack Red

Buck Shack: Shannon’s popular red blend is aged in bourbon barrels to soften the tannins and lend hints of whisky and vanilla. It’s sold in 750L whisky bottle. The name Buck Shack is a nod to the 100-year-old skinning shed located on his ranch known as “Ye Old Buck Shack.” “This is a wine about having fun, Shannon shared. SRP $35

Shannon calls Ovis his “sexy Cabernet Sauvignon. This estate grown single vineyard red is barrel-aged 20 to 24 months and then another year aged in bottle. The name Ovis translates in Latin to sheep, and there are 3000 of these wooly creatures on Shannon’s ranch. Would pairing this rich, dense red wine with roasted lamb feel appropriate? SRP $60

Listen here to our SIPS podcast with Clay Shannon (link). Or click below.

Categories
Drink THE CONNECTED TABLE RADIO SHOW

Botas De Barro- The Story of the “Muddy Boots”

Nicola Thornton grew up in the U.K. but fell in love with Spain after attending university there. She moved and entered the wine industry. We first met Thornton when she was working for a well-known producer in Toro.  We’ve stayed in touch over the years and were delighted to spotlight Thornton in two podcasts for The Connected Table SIPS.

 

 

The first podcast discussed the expert set up called Spanish Palate. Thornton says she looks for independent producers that are “magical little gems with great stories,” giving them a voice and introducing them to international markets. Working with a largely female team, Thornton has helped over 100 wine producers from 20 different regions in Spain find their place in over 40 countries, al in under three years.  www.spanishpalate.es Facebook/ Instagram: spanishpalate

 

But that’s just the start of Thornton’s efforts. While working the business she said she became acquainted with local grape growers and aware of the hardships they faced.  She created Botas de Barro (named after the farmers´muddy boots) to help give them renewed hope and support, encouraging them to continue to nurture their low-yield, ancient vineyards, many over 100 years old. Grapes are sourced from small independent grape growers throughout Spain to produce its portfolio of wines. www.botasdebarro.com. Facebook: botasdebarro

 

Nicola Thornton with one of Spain’s many old vines

Listen now. Click link below or here

Listen now or click here

 

This podcast is part of our special series recognizing women in wine and spirits. A donation has been made to Les Dames d’Escoffier, an organization to supporting women in the fine food and beverage industry through education and advocacy www.ldei.org . For information on featuring a dynamic women for this series, contact melanie@theconnectedtable.com.